Impulse buying redefined – Apple Pay used to buy $1.01 million 1964 Aston Martin DB5


You lay eyes on your (exorbitantly-priced) dream car and feel the instant urge to have it. What would you do? A certain sometime didn’t waste even these few seconds you’ve paused right now to think about it – He went right ahead and bought his dream set of wheels. Drowning further into the adrenaline impulse, he bought the $1.01 million 1964 Aston Martin DB5 using Apple Pay! This has marked two firsts: 1) The biggest transaction known till date using the Apple Pay digital wallet service 2) The first ever historic vehicle to be sold/bought via social media.

The vintage DB5 was listed through Kensington-based auctioneer Coys’ Vero profile page. Vero is a next-gen social platform that Coy uses to list certain vehicles that are up for sale or are heading to auction.

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Since the time Apple Pay initially debuted, its users tripled (as of summer 2016), however, interest was nosediving. While in March 2015, 48% users said they used it at every chance they got, as of June 2016, this number plummeted to 21.3%. This new development has however turned things around. As mentioned in a recent Financial Times report, Apple earns 0.15% from every Apple Pay transaction, working out to 15 cents per $100. With this impulse buy, the Cupertino company has made approximately $1,500.

This vintage right-hand drive silver birch Aston Martin DB5 has been completely restored with an engine rebuild, new gearbox, new suspension, and overall is said to be in ‘superb condition’. It has red leather interiors, complete documentation, and has covered just 58,225 miles. With all these features in addition to being almost identical to what James Bond drove in Goldfinger, it isn’t surprising that the vehicle is so highly sought after.

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Though not identical, something similar did happen back in 2010, when renowned Indian painter M F Husain swiped his credit card to purchase a Bentley. Clearly, plastic money and shiny new tech platforms are helping bring the past into the present, and someday, possibly even the future!

[Via:Motorauthority]