The future of first class air travel is here and it sure looks promising


London based design studio Seymourpowell has revealed plans for a First Class aircraft cabin that’s being dubbed the “Boutique hotel of the skies.” Called First Spaces, these cabins will feature private rooms and full sized beds offering more than enough personal space for luxury loving passengers.

first-spaces-seymour-powell-airplane-interior (7)
Guests can choose from four single rooms or two double rooms, all of which offer completely private accommodation.

first-spaces-seymour-powell-airplane-interior (2)
Each room includes a full sized bed, storage space for luggage, hanging space, clothes drawer and a table.

first-spaces-seymour-powell-airplane-interior (4)
Each room contains a tablet that allows passengers to control the seat positions and lighting as well as surf the internet and order food.

READ:  Airbus is poised to transform air travel with their new modular cabin concept: Transpose

first-spaces-seymour-powell-airplane-interior (1)
The cabins use a neutral color palette and aim to offer hotel-like accommodation, new technology, and contemporary luxury.

One element of new tech is the Smart Inflight Service System (SISS) which uses sensors in the cabins to gather information and combines the data they provide with passenger preferences to help the crew anticipate their guest’s needs throughout the flight.

first-spaces-seymour-powell-airplane-interior (3)
“We’ve long been considering ways to create aircraft interiors that can adapt more to suit the needs of passengers and add flexibility to the business models of airlines,” said Jeremy White, head of transport at Seymourpowell.

READ:  This concept luxury aircraft designed for scenic tours will offer unobstructed panoramic views

first-spaces-seymour-powell-airplane-interior (6)
“Lead times for new aircraft and their expected service life are so long that we’ve had to think well beyond fashion and style trends and instead understand how new technologies might enable change, and how passengers’ future needs and expectations will evolve,” said founder Dick Powell.

[ Via : Dezeen ]