For $250,000 this expedition will take you 12,500 feet beneath the chilling waters of the North Atlantic Ocean to explore the wreckage of the Titanic.

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There have been several legends and myths surrounding the RMS Titanic over the years. Some called it unsinkable, and then there are stories about the band that played the last song. In short, the more you delve, the more you discover. If the Titanic and its poor fate have always intrigued you, then it’s time you packed your bags and emptied your wallets to head to the seabed of the North Atlantic Oceans, Ttianics permanent address. OceanGate Expeditions is taking charge (literally) to take you there in its second annual expedition, dubbed The Titanic Expedition, for a whopping $250,000.

The eight-day-long missions, which are usually conducted in May and end in June, take explorers, or mission specialists as they are called, on the expedition vessel from St John’s in Newfoundland, Canada, to the site of the Titanic wreckage, located 370 miles away. Each dive lasts eight to ten hours in a submersible made of five-manned carbon fiber and titanium. The technologically advanced Titan submersible is well equipped to help in the exploration owing to its latest camera technologies that can determine the wreck’s rate of decay and assess the marine life on it.

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OceanGate Expeditions’ president, Stockton Rush, said in a release, “Mission specialists helped our crew gather and review terabytes of the highest-resolution still images and video of Titanic and the debris field ever collected. Geek wire reports veteran submersible pilot P.H. Nargolet’s comments, who participated in OceanGate’s 2021 expedition, “Over the past 30 years, I have completed more than 30 dives to the Titanic,” he said. “The bow is the most exciting part of the Titanic to see. Year after year, I have seen a lot of deterioration. It isn’t going faster, but you can seem more of the inside of the ship as the wreck decays. Also, the mast has fallen down on the well deck.”

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The Titanic sank on 1 May 1912, taking with it more than 1500 passengers and crew. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the hull and structure of the ship are likely to collapse within the next 40 years. It’s time to make the most of this expedition.

Via Facebook / @OceanGate Expeditions

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