23,000 trees, hanging gardens and waterfalls – Taipei’s futuristic smog-absorbing skyscraper is a star of sustainable architecture


It’s time that the world got accustomed to fascinating examples of cutting edge architecture that is based on the theme of sustainability. Simply put, sustainable residential structures built to plant over 23,000 trees are the future, and it looks gorgeously green. Paris-based architect Vincent Callebaut is the brainchild behind the tower titled ‘Tao Zhu Yin Yuan’. The project that started in 2010 is essentially a twisting, double-helix shaped eco-building replete with waterfalls, sprawling green plantations that will be equipped to absorb up to 130 tonnes of carbon dioxide each year. Located in central Taipei’s Xinjin district, the landscape, designed by San Francisco firm SWA, is a splendid example of ‘vertical forests’ with the cascading shape intended to create effective open-air gardens, meaning that the balcony surface area can easily exceed the required minimum of 10%. The twist also allows inhabitants to enjoy panoramic skyline views for which each of the 20 storey is rotated an incremental 4.5 degrees as the building ascends.

Other environmental features include a rainwater recycling system, low e-glass, a photovoltaic solar array on the roof and canopies, energy-saving lifts, and automated energy-saving monitors that adapt to climatic conditions. A similar Solforest Ecopark luxury development was constructed in Vietnam. Another such construction was built in Chengdu’s Qiyi City Forest Garden that unfortunately went from eco-paradise to veritable hell after the apartments were left unoccupied by tenants due to infestation of mosquitoes.

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[Via: Designboom]